Share

Rhode Island Legal Blog

Friday, May 4, 2018

Protecting Your Business with the Right Insurance

Starting a business is the dream of a lifetime for many Americans. While most entrepreneurs prefer to focus on the aspects of the business that will result in profit, it’s equally important to consider what will happen in the event of an emergency, injury or even sudden death. In preparing for the “worst case scenario”, insurance coverage must be carefully considered. Selecting insurance policies can be challenging; there are dozens of options and the necessity of some will depend largely on the type of business, the number of employees (if any) and the physical location(s).

To help you get started with your planning, we’ve compiled a quick checklist of different types of insurance that all business owners should consider:

General Liability Insurance – Regardless of the type of business or where it is located (even if it is in your home office), all owners should purchase this type of insurance which provides protection if you or your employees cause bodily harm or property damage to a third party. This type of insurance can protect against a customer who brings legal action after taking a sip of hot tea that you served in the reception area or even a vendor who was injured when an item from a closet shelf fell on him during a delivery to your office.


Read more . . .


Friday, April 27, 2018

Do I need to file a DBA for my small business?

Selecting a name for your business can be challenging. It must be unique, memorable and representative of your product or service. Depending on the name you ultimately choose, you may also need to file for a DBA.

Simply defined, DBA stands for “Doing Business As.” A DBA is a fictitious business name, also referred to as an assumed business name, that differs from the personal name of the owner(s) or the official name of a registered corporation. For example, if Patricia Smith is a sole proprietor and opens her bakery under the name of Patty’s Cakes, the bakery would have an assumed name because it is not the owner’s legal name.


Read more . . .


Tuesday, April 17, 2018

How to Negotiate the Lease on Your Office Space


It can be very exciting for a business owner to finally find office space that will work for his or her business. Do not let this excitement prevent you from taking the time upfront to make sure the office space and the lease agreement associated with the office space will be right for you. Negotiating the best office lease to meet the needs of your business can save you a great deal of money and headaches down the road.
Read more . . .


Thursday, April 12, 2018

Changing Your Business Entity from a Sole Proprietorship

What does the transition entail?

There are various ways you can restructure the legal framework of your company if you wish to add a partner to your sole proprietorship, though each option has different requirements. It's possible to merely act as "partners" without any formal agreement, but that's generally not a good idea. The smart choice is to create a business entity, such as a corporation or limited liability company.
Here are a few facts and considerations to keep in mind as you restructure your company from a sole proprietorship to another business entity.


Read more . . .


Friday, April 6, 2018

Financial Records and Your Business

In starting a business, entrepreneurs are inundated with paperwork, legal requirements and numerous planning meetings. While most of these activities seem burdensome, many business owners cite financial management and record-keeping as the most daunting task of daily operations. With some businesses having thousands of transactions each day, coupled with expenses and employee payroll, it should come as no surprise that business financials can be overwhelming. With so many documents and figures, it can be difficult to stay organized and leads many business owners to question what they are required to keep and what they can simply discard.


Read more . . .


Friday, March 30, 2018

An Introduction to Benefit Corporations

Most business owners in the United States have heard of C-Corporations and S- Corporations but over the past few years, a new corporate form has emerged that is not yet well known – the benefit corporation (B-Corp). Unlike C and S Corporations which can be used across almost all industries for a wide range of small and large businesses, the benefit corporation was designed specifically for for-profit entities that want to benefit society by solving social or environmental problems while also benefitting the shareholders. To date, there are nearly 1000 benefit corporations around the world. A good example of a benefit corporation is Yellow Leaf Hammocks, a California-based company that sells high-quality hammocks that are hand woven by hill-tribe artisans in rural northern Thailand. While generating profit, the company also creates jobs, helping with economic development in an impoverished community.


Read more . . .


Friday, March 16, 2018

Opening a new restaurant? Some key legal considerations for restaurateurs

Each year, approximately 30,000 new restaurants are opened in the United States. Most restaurateurs understand the great risk that comes with these ventures; in fact, some sources estimate as many as 18,000 of the 30,000 restaurants opened this year will fail within the first three years in business. Despite the risk, many chefs and hospitality professionals dive right in. If you’re a hopeful restaurateur, legal planning is an absolute necessity to ensure you don’t fall victim to many of the common mistakes that cause these businesses to fail. Consider the following:


Read more . . .


Friday, March 2, 2018

Buying an Existing Franchise

While purchasing and establishing a new franchise unit may seem easier than starting from scratch with your own business model, it is still a time consuming and expensive undertaking. Franchisees must find a location, make needed renovations and secure various licenses or permits. Of course, even after the business opens its doors, it will take more time to acquire loyal customers and generate revenue. With big expenses and minimal revenue, it should come as no surprise that most new businesses operate in the red for the first year or two. If you are an aspiring entrepreneur who is looking to hit the ground running, it might be a good idea to avoid the laborious setup process and consider buying an existing franchise, often referred to as a “resale.”


Read more . . .


Friday, February 23, 2018

Corporate Bylaws: What Do I Need to Include?

Corporate bylaws are a critical component in the foundation of any corporation, partnership or association. Generally speaking, the bylaws establish the rules for internal operations and governance.  While business owners have a large degree of control when it comes to the bylaws, they must be in compliance with state law. Some states have strict mandates on what information must be included, while others may not specify exactly what must be covered and there may not be a set format. However, there are certain things that are typically covered in a company's bylaws.


Read more . . .


Friday, February 16, 2018

Dissolving a General Partnership

There are a number of reasons to dissolve a general partnership.  Whether business is not going well, you can’t get along with your business associates or you are ready to retire, it might be time to end your partnership.  Before making the final decision, you should consider whether dissolving the partnership is the only option.  Is there any other way to alleviate the problem?  Could you buy out your partner or simply sell your share allowing the business to continue under different management?  Dissolution is generally not a simple process, and if it is your only option, it’s important that you be aware of some important issues that may be present.


Read more . . .


Friday, February 2, 2018

Working With an Independant Contractor

If you are a business owner, you will likely consider hiring an independent contractor to assist with one, or multiple projects.  Independent contractors can be beneficial is a variety of situations and should not be overlooked as assets to your business.  It is important for management to understand how these workers are classified and the legal implications that may result from working with them.

Independent contractors are those that provide services to an individual or business but that retain control over how those services are rendered.  In an employer-employee situation, the employer has control over what the employee does and how he does it.  When it comes to independent contractors, employers have much less control.  This level of control is one of the determining factors when it comes to classifying workers as employees or independent contractors.  Control comes in varying degrees and might refer to many different aspects of the employment; this may include scheduling, the methods and techniques that a worker uses, training, where the work is done and the frequency of the work.  There is no one test or bright line to determine if someone is an employee or an independent contractor and all factors have to be taken into consideration in each case.  Sometimes, the details of employment are agreed to in a contract.  If you’re considering hiring an independent contractor, you should enter into a formal contract with them up front in order to avoid confusion in the event of a conflict.


Read more . . .


Archived Posts

2019
2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2014
2013
2012


The Law Offices of Richard Palumbo, LLC assists clients with Real Estate Law, Business Law, Probate, Evictions for Landlords and Property Damage matters in Rhode Island including Cranston, Warwick, Coventry, Johnston, Providence, Pawtucket, Central Falls and all areas throughout RI.



© 2019 Law Offices of Richard Palumbo, LLC | Disclaimer
535 Atwood Avenue, Suite 4, Cranston, RI 02920
| Phone: 401.490.0994

Business Disputes Litigation | Business Law | Civil Litigation | Commercial Real Estate | Condominium Law | Construction Litigation | Estate Litigation | Evictions | Mortgage Foreclosures | Purchase/Sale of a Business | Commercial Real Estate | Probate & Estate Administration | Product Liability | Property Damage & Insurance Law | Real Estate Law | Real Estate Litigation | Residential Real Estate | REO Services | | Resources

Attorney Website Design by
Zola Creative