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Rhode Island Legal Blog

Friday, December 15, 2017

Should Employers Enroll in E-Verify? Pros and Cons

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, in partnership with the Social Security Administration (SSA), offers E-Verify to help employers instantly determine an employee's eligibility to work.  Initial confirmations and "Tentative Non Confirmations" are available in as little as three to five seconds.

The voluntary Internet-based program works by comparing the information from an employee’s Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, with Department of Homeland Security and Social Security Administration records.  Instead of simply retaining I-9s on file in their own offices, employers who enroll in E-Verify must enter the I-9s of all new hires into the program's database.


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Friday, December 1, 2017

Form I-9 Inspections

The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) requires employers to verify the identity of their employees and their eligibility to work in the U.S.  To comply, employers must retain original I-9 Forms for current employees and, for former employees, keep them for at least three years.  These need not be submitted to the government but must be available for inspection.  From time to time, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) ask to inspect the forms. 

What Does an Inspection Entail?

An employer who receives a Notice of Inspection must produce its I-9s, usually within 3 business days, and may be asked for payroll records, employee lists, articles of incorporation, and business licenses.  ICE may ask the employer to bring the documents to an ICE field office, or officials may visit the employer.  At the inspection, in addition to printed documents, the employer must retrieve any electronically stored documents requested and provide the ICE officer with the hardware and software needed to view them.  The employer must also provide an electronic summary of information in the I-9s, if one exists.


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Saturday, November 25, 2017

Privacy and Security in Business

Almost every business collects uses and records customer information in some way, shape or form.  Your business may obtain names, addresses, telephone numbers, credit and debit card information, social security numbers or health care and insurance information in the ordinary course of business.  This data is often required in order for you to be able to serve your customers. However, you are responsible for keeping this data secure and your business must comply with Federal and state laws governing it.  The loss, theft and/or unauthorized use of this information could have devastating effects on your customer’s lives and on your business. 


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Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Franchise Agreements

A franchise agreement is a contract that governs a franchise relationship.  These agreements are entered into by the franchisor, the entity that owns the business model, and the franchisee, the individual or entity that will run a location of the business.  While the terms of each contract are unique to the particular deal, most include similar provisions. 

Most franchise agreements will include provisions describing where the franchise will operate and whether that territory is exclusive.  The agreement will also detail how long the franchise relationship will last.


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Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Common Area Expenses in Commercial Leases

There are different types of commercial leases, such as gross leases, modified gross leases and net leases.  One variation of the net lease is a “triple net” lease, in which the tenant is liable for a net amount of property taxes, insurance and common area maintenance relating to the property they are possessing.  Most of the time, additional fees in the form of common area maintenance expenses come up in the context of a triple net lease.  Landlords ask tenants to pay these fees so that they contribute to the cost of maintaining common areas such as entranceways, walkways, parking lots and hallways, as well as services enjoyed by the tenant such as janitors, security and landscapers.  These fees are in addition to a rental payment and can be substantial depending upon the situation. 


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Monday, October 30, 2017

Do Single Member LLCs Provide Asset Protection?

A limited liability company is a very popular business form that combines some of the best features of a corporation and a partnership.  Like a partnership, an LLC is taxed through its individual members.  Like a corporation, it provides limited liability to its members.  In most situations, the personal assets of LLC members cannot be reached for the debts or liabilities of the business.  But, also similar to a corporation, there are certain scenarios where personal assets can be reached.  Most LLCs have more than one member.  In recent years, a variation called the single member LLC has become widely used.  As the name suggests, these LLCs have only one member.  While the structure and organizational requirements of single member LLCs are essentially the same as ordinary LLCs, there has been some uncertainty as to whether these businesses afford their members the same type of limited liability.


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Monday, October 16, 2017

What Your Loved Ones Absolutely Need to Know About Your Estate Plan

The conversation about a person’s last wishes can be an awkward one for both the individual who is the topic of conversation and his or her loved ones. The end of someone’s life is not a topic anyone looks forward to discussing. It is, however, an important conversation that must be had so that the family understands  the testator’s final wishes before he or she passes away. If a significant sum is being left to someone or some entity outside of the family, an explanation of this action may go a long way to avoiding a contested will. In a similar vein, if one heir is receiving a larger share of the estate than the others, it is prudent to have this action explained. If funds are being placed in a trust instead of given directly to the heirs, it makes sense for the testator to advise his or her loved ones in advance.


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Wednesday, October 4, 2017

How to Negotiate a Commercial Real Estate Lease

There are number of considerations for business owners involved in negotiating a commercial lease, not the least of which is the fact that the main objective of landlords is to maximize profits. By understanding the following fundamental concepts, it is possible to make a good deal.


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Friday, September 29, 2017

Legal Concerns When Doing Business Online

We live in a digital world and if you are not doing business online you could be missing out on the profits and other benefits of this marketplace.  If you want to expand your business horizons using the internet, you should be aware of the legal implications that may come along with the benefits.  You should make your customers aware of your policies when doing business online and it is also imperative that you tend to intellectual property concerns at the same time.


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Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Should I Transfer My Home to My Children?

Most people are aware that probate should be avoided if at all possible. It is an expensive, time-consuming process that exposes your family’s private matters to public scrutiny via the judicial system. It sounds simple enough to just gift your property to your children while you are still alive, so it is not subject to probate upon your death, or to preserve the asset in the event of significant end-of-life medical expenses.


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Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Legal Concerns for Businesses Engaged in Social Networking

Social media is a phenomenon and in this day and age, it is rare that an individual, organization or business does not utilize it.  The use of websites like Facebook, Twitter and Linkedin can be of great benefit to your business and can assist in advertising, marketing and branding.  But, it is important to remember that their use is not without legal pitfalls.


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The Law Offices of Richard Palumbo, LLC assists clients with Real Estate Law, Business Law, Probate, Evictions for Landlords and Property Damage matters in Rhode Island including Cranston, Warwick, Coventry, Johnston, Providence, Pawtucket, Central Falls and all areas throughout RI.



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