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Rhode Island Legal Blog

Monday, December 26, 2016

The Rule against Perpetuities

The law allows a person preparing a will to have almost complete control over his or her assets after the testator passes on, but there are limits to such power. A person can restrict a property from being sold, or make sure that it is used for a specific purpose. A property can be bequeathed to a family member as long on condition that the person maintains the family business in a specific city, or exercises daily, or places flowers on the deceased's grave every week, or engages in any other behavior the testator desires. This freedom, however, is not without limits. The time limit on this ability is called the rule against perpetuities. The rule is also referred to as the “dead man’s hand” statute.

The rule against perpetuities is complex and rarely utilized. At the time of the passing of the testator, the heirs of the estate are locked in. These heirs are referred to as “lives in being.” For the purposes of this rule, if a child is conceived but not yet born at the time of the testator’s death, it will be considered a life in being. Once the last living heir named in the will passes away, the restrictions on the property will continue in place as the testator desired for 21 years. The idea is that a testator may control his assets for a full generation after his or her death. The rule is notoriously difficult to apply properly. When it does apply, the conditions on the bequest are abandoned and the gift returns to the residual estate.

What makes this rule so confusing is that, when an individual writes a will, he or she may make gifts to potential children or grandchildren. These children and grandchildren, however, may not be born until years later. If a child has been born at the time the decedent passes away, he or she is subject to the restrictions on the bequest during his or her lifetime. If a grandchild is conceived and born after the decedent’s death, however, the child may avoid the restrictions 21 years after the death of the last heir alive at the time of the decedent’s death. There is no way to predict when this might occur. The rule is archaic and easily avoided. A knowledgeable attorney can help a person planning his or her estate set up an equitable trust. Similar to a will, a trust may impose conditions on the use of assets, but is not subject to the rule against perpetuities. There are other advantages to a trust, but one of the most important is avoiding this unpredictable and confusing rule.


Monday, December 19, 2016

Patents

Inventors have a right to protect their inventions through the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). With the creation of a device come a bundle of property rights issued by the United States Government.   A patent prevents all “others from making, using, or selling the invention in the United States.”  The patent may survive for varying periods of time, depending on what type of patent is applied for and issued. Typically, protection does not activate until the patent is legally granted. 

Not all creations can be patented.  Only a device that is “new, non-obvious and useful” may qualify for a “utility patent.”  Abstract or theoretical concepts or ideas may not be protected by means of a patent.  Likewise, an invention is not patentable if it has been “publically disclosed.”  In order to determine this, patent searches should be conducted prior to filing an application. These searches may be very complex and an attorney’s instruction is advised.

Creations that cannot be approved under patent law may still be protectable through another method, such as trademark or copyright law. An intellectual property (IP) attorney can help advise clients about making the appropriate distinctions. An IP attorney is available not only to educate clients on the various application requirements for all types of intellectual property, but is prepared to provide provisional or non-provisional applications for patents. A non-provisional application establishes the filing date of the patent application, beginning the application process.  A provisional application only establishes the filing date and automatically expires after one year.

If there is more than one person involved in the creation of an invention, the partners may need to file an application as "joint inventors." Unfortunately, there are often disputes concerning which individual actually created the invention; sometime both parties claim to be the "sole inventor." Usually, after thoroughly analyzing all the facts, the attorney(s) can determine whether one or both inventors have the right to file the patent or whether they should file jointly.

There are several fees involved in obtaining a patent license, including filing, issuance, and maintenance fees.  An experienced IP attorney can inform clients of the timetable they will be responsible for, and clarify when various terms, such as "patent pending" or "patent applied for" are supposed to be used to keep the public updated regarding where the inventor is in the patent application process. 


Monday, December 5, 2016

The Revocable Living Trust

There are many benefits to a revocable living trust that are not available in a will.  An individual can choose to have one or both, and an attorney can best clarify the advantages of each.  If the person engaged in planning his or her estate wants to retain the ability to change or rescind the document, the living trust is probably the best option since it is revocable. 

The document is called a “living” trust because it is applicable throughout one's lifetime.  Another individual or entity, such as a bank, can be appointed as trustee to manage and protect assets and to distribute assets to beneficiaries upon one's death. 

A living trust will also protect assets if and when a person becomes sick or disabled.  The designated trustee will hold “legal title” of the assets in the trust.  If an individual wants to maintain full control over his or her property, he or she may also choose to remain the holder of the title as trustee. 

It should be noted, however, that the revocable power that comes with the trust may involve taxation. Usually, a trust is considered a part of the decedent’s estate, and therefore, an estate tax applies.  One cannot escape liability via a trust because the assets are still subject to debts upon death.  On the upside, the trust may not need to go through probate, which could save months of time and attorneys' fees. 

The revocable living trust is contrary to the irrevocable living trust, in that the latter cannot be rescinded or altered during one's lifetime.  It does, however, avoid the tax consequences of a revocable trust.  An attorney can explain the intricacies of other protections an irrevocable living trust provides. 

Anyone who wants to keep certain information or assets private, will likely want to create a living trust.  A trust is not normally made public, whereas a will is put into the public record once it passes through probate.   Consulting with an attorney can help determine the best methods to ensure protection of assets in individual cases.   


Monday, November 28, 2016

Non-Compete Agreements - Are they enforceable?

Courts typically disfavor “covenants not to compete” or “non-compete agreements.”  Therefore, the terms and provisions of these contracts must not be overly restrictive of the employee.  In order for a non-compete to be upheld, the document must “be reasonable in scope, geography, and time.”  It cannot last for years on end, or prevent the employee from working anywhere in the entire state. Likewise, an employer cannot prohibit an employee from working in a large variety of industries, especially if the restriction includes industries wholly unrelated to the employer’s line of work. 

Two other elements are analyzed by a court to determine the validity of a non-compete agreement:  (1) there must be mutual consideration between both the employer and employee at the moment the contract is signed and (2) the non-competition agreement must protect “a legitimate business interest of the employer.”  Preventing a former employee from working for an employer’s business rival, or preventing disclosure of trade secrets or personally identifiable information of important clientele, are typically considered justifiable business interests.

Non-compete agreements are generally implemented to protect a company’s most important assets:  its reputation and its confidential information.  However, the terms protecting these assets cannot be overly broad or vague.  Thus, in evaluating the “reasonableness” of a non-competition agreement, the court will conduct a “balancing test.”  This is a comparison of the employer’s need to protect its “business interests” with the “burden that enforcement of the agreement would place on the employee.” 

The validity of non-compete agreements is decided on a case-by-case basis. The court will consider circumstances such as the length of time certain information will be kept confidential, and the company’s reasons for limiting the employee's job search to a geographical area. If the court finds that the agreement serves a valid interest and does not exceed the range necessary to protect that interest, the entire agreement may be upheld. 

The court also has the option of doing away with overly intrusive terms in a non-compete, rather than invalidating the agreement entirely. In cases in which a non-compete is perceived by the court as punitive, unduly restricting an employee from obtaining employment, the agreement will not be upheld.  A licensed attorney who specializes in employment law will be able to gauge the likelihood that a particular non-compete agreement will be enforceable.


Monday, November 21, 2016

How to calculate estate tax

In order to predict how much your estate will have to pay in taxes, one must first determine the value of the estate. To determine this, many assets might have to be appraised at fair market value. The estate includes all assets including real estate, cash, securities, stocks, bonds, business interests, loans receivable, furnishings, jewelry, and other valuables.

Once your net worth is established, you can subtract liabilities like mortgages, credit cards, other legitimate debts, funeral expenses, medical bills, and the administrative cost to settle your estate including attorney, accounting and appraisal fees, storage and shipping fees, insurances, and court fees. The administrative expenses will likely total roughly 5% of the total estate. Any assets that is bequeathed to charity through a trust escapes taxation, and the value of those assets must be subtracted from the total. Any assets transferred to a surviving spouse are not subject to taxation as long as your spouse is a US citizen.

If the net worth of an estate is less than the Federal and state exemptions, no taxes must be paid. However, the value of assets over the exemptions will be taxed. The amount over the exemptions is referred to as the taxable estate. A testator’s assets are taxed by the state in which the will is probated. Taxes paid by the estate to the state may be deducted for Federal tax purposes. The Federal exemption was $5.43 million in 2015 and is slated to increase in 2016. The top Federal estate tax rate in 2015 was 40%.

If an estate earns money while it is being administered and distributed, for example, if real estate is rented or businesses continue to operate, it will be necessary for the estate to complete a tax return and pay taxes on the income it receives. The net income of the estate can be added to the taxable portion of the estate if it is over the federal or state exemption. It is important to be aware that the laws surrounding estate taxes change frequently and require seasoned professionals to navigate, and to notify you if changes in the laws will affect your estate plan. 


Monday, November 7, 2016

Trade Secret Vs. Patent Protection

Many business owners wonder which type of Intellectual Property protection is the best fit for their business purposes?  A “trade secret” is intellectual property that is kept private in order to maintain its financial value in the marketplace.  Examples of trade secrets include: “a formula, pattern, compilation, program, device, method, technique or process.”  

Alternatively, a “patent” generally protects a “new and useful process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof.”  Thus, a creation may receive protection under either patent or trademark law, but not both, due to varying disclosure rules.  Also, there are several types of patents available, including utility, design, and plant patents. 

Companies that make it a priority to preserve their trade secrets will go to great lengths to prevent others from misusing or misappropriating their critical information. It is likely that a business will seek out the powers of the court system in order to protect the financially viable benefit that derives from their trade secrets. In cases where trade secrets have been violated, courts may order the culpable party to preserve confidentiality or pay expenses, which often include any damages a business sustains as a result of the misuse of a trade secret. 

However, trade secret protection is not without its limits. If a trade secret becomes publically known through an authorized admission, protection may be completely lost.  Additionally, trade secret protection does not protect a business from “independent discovery.”  Independent discovery is when a third party discovers, for example, the formula to a best-selling beverage, on its own.  

On the other hand, trade secret protection usually does not terminate the way other types of intellectual property (such as patents) do.  A patent only protects the inventor for a restricted period of time.  A patent license might not be a good fit if the intention is to keep certain data about the creation a secret.  In order to apply for a patent, intricate details about the device in question have to be revealed, and upon expiration, the information disclosed may become free for anyone to use. 

An intellectual property attorney is capable of evaluating original works and counseling clients on the various types of protection afforded under intellectual property law. He or she will offer good advice about which type of protection best suits each individual situation. 


Monday, October 31, 2016

Disinheritance

Inheritance laws involve legal rights to property after a death and such laws differ from state-to-state.   Heirs usually consist of close family members and exclude estranged relatives.  Depending on the wording of a will, an individual can be intentionally, or even unintentionally, disinherited.

In most cases, spouses may not be legally disinherited.  Certain contracts, however, allow for a legitimate disinheritance, such as prenuptial agreements or postnuptial agreements.  These contracts are typically valid methods of disinheritance because the presumed-to-be inheriting spouse has agreed to the arrangement by signing the document.  

If there is no prenuptial arrangement, then the state’s elective share statute or “equitable distribution” laws protect the surviving spouse.  Pursuant to the elective share statute, he or she may collect a certain percentage of the estate. 

In states that follow “community property” or “common law” rules, however, the outcome may be different.   An attorney should be consulted for clarification of the differences in the law.  Divorces affect spousal inheritance rights.  Post-divorce, it is prudent to consult an attorney to draft a fresh will, in order to prevent confusion and unintentional dissemination of assets.

If the will is unambiguous, it is usually possible for a child to be disinherited.   It should be noted, however, that it is highly likely that close relatives will challenge or contest a will in which they have been disinherited.  Fighting such a lawsuit may put a great financial strain on the estate's assets.  Depending on how time-consuming and expensive it is to defend the will, less money may be available for distribution to the intended beneficiaries. 

There are ways to protect estate assets from such problems, for example through trusts.  It is essential for an individual to receive the counsel of a licensed lawyer in order to effectively protect his or her estate as inexpensively as possible.


Monday, October 17, 2016

Oral Contracts & The Statute of Frauds - Is the Agreement Binding?

There is a widespread misconception that verbal contracts are unenforceable.  Nevertheless, a contract made orally with another party, without embodying the particular terms in a signed writing, can still be valid and binding. Even so, any disagreement concerning the deal may pose multiple problems for both parties.  In order for the court to give a verbal contract legal effect, the terms of the deal will have to be demonstrated. This could involve pricey litigation and an extensive discovery process.  Therefore, it is advisable to have an attorney draft any contractual agreement.

Moreover, according to the Statute of Frauds, there are certain contracts that must be in writing in order to be legally binding.  This may include contracts for the sale of land or real estate, surety agreements, in which one person guarantees to take over another's contractual obligations, and service agreements that take over one year to complete.  Other agreements that must be written to be legally binding may include agreements “made in the consideration of marriage,” or those made for the sale of goods valued at $500 or more. If the requirements for contractual validity are not met, either party runs the risk of the other party rescinding the contract by declaring it void.

The Statute of Frauds not only aims to prevent deception or fraud; it requires precise terms to be set in writing for a contract to be valid. The Statute of Frauds typically requires the document to include a description of the “subject matter” of the agreement, the main stipulations to the deal, and the signatures of the parties.  Nevertheless, these requirements may vary with the sale of goods under the Uniform Commercial Code, where a signature by the “party to be charged” may be sufficient.  For a sale of goods, the terms typically should include the price and quantity of the goods. 

Sometimes, if the contract is unenforceable under the Statute of Frauds, it may be saved if one party suffered by relying on the contract and if the injured party can prove this reliance in court.  Likewise, an exception may exist if “specially manufactured goods” were provided under the contract or one party “partially performed” what was required by the agreement.  The outcome may also vary if two merchants were the contracting parties.  Seek advice from a licensed business law and contract attorney to evaluate agreements and determine whether they are legally enforceable. 


Monday, October 10, 2016

Testamentary Substitutes

In states that have “elective share statutes,” a surviving spouse is legally entitled to a certain percentage of the deceased's estate, even if that spouse has attempted to disinherit or to provide a lesser bequest, or gift, under the will.  In “separate property” states, an elective share statute is likely to be in effect.  If the estate in question is valued at $50,000 or less, the elective share is likely to be the actual amount of the net estate.  

“Testamentary substitutes” are removed from particular assets that would otherwise pass to the surviving spouse.  Assets passing by will or through intestacy could cause a reduction in the elective share amount as well.  Totten trusts, such as Payable-On-Death Bank Accounts (PODs), Retirement or joint bank accounts, gifts causa mortis ("gifts made by the decedent in contemplation of death,”) U.S. savings bonds, jointly held property, and gifts or transfers that were made approximately one year prior to death, are some examples of testamentary substitutes. 

If a gift was made about one year prior to death, yet involves medical or educational expenses, then the gift may not qualify as a true testamentary substitute.  With regard to PODs, the spouse, offspring, or grandchildren will be named as beneficiaries.  The funds of a POD are only distributed upon the decedent’s death.   Testamentary Trusts are listed in the will until the designated property passes to the trust upon the testator’s death.  

Generally, a gift causa mortis is only active upon the decedent’s expected death and is typically revocable.  Moreover, certain elements must exist to create a valid gift causa mortis.  These include an intent to create “an immediate transfer of ownership,” valid delivery, acceptance of the gift by the donee, and the donor’s “anticipation of imminent death.”  There are also certain circumstances by which gifts causa mortis are not valid.  For example, if the donee passes away before the donor, it is unlikely that a property interest was transferred.  Gifts causa mortis are also taxed as if the testator had listed the gifts in his or her will. 

In such cases, testamentary substitutes are generally put back into the net estate total to determine the elective share amount that the surviving spouse will collect.  The aforementioned may vary if property is held jointly, as joint tenants or otherwise, because the spouse may have a right of survivorship in the property.  Estate planning attorneys are aware of all the ins and outs of testamentary substitutes and how they may affect the distribution of your assets.  It is useful, if not essential, to consult with a knowledgeable attorney when making arrangements regarding testamentary substitutes.


Monday, September 26, 2016

Copyright Protection and Fair Use

Authors often want to understand the eligibility of their writings for copyright protection. Legal copyright registration provides the copyright holder with a collection of special rights. Under the U.S. Copyright Act, a rightful owner maintains the “exclusive right to reproduce, distribute, perform, display, license, and . . . prepare derivative works” founded on his or her creations.  However, these “exclusive” rights are curtailed by the “fair use” doctrine, which typically allows others to use your work legally for certain limited purposes, such as “criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research.” 

A court makes the final determination about whether a particular use of a registered work comes within the “fair use” doctrine. Factors that a court may use to verify whether a particular use is permissible under the statute may include “the purpose and character of the use.”  For instance, if a third-party utilizes your registered work for an educational and nonprofit purpose, the use is unlikely to be categorized as copyright infringement.  

The court may also look at “the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole.”  It is likely to be copyright infringement if a large portion of the work has been used, where the user is effectively usurping the work as his or her own.  The court may also analyze “the effect of the use upon the potential market for, or value of, the copyrighted work.”  Furthermore, if a third party did not publish the work in question, the action may still constitute fair use. 

Copyright protection spans “architectural design, software, the graphic arts, motion pictures, and sound recordings.”  Consulting with an intellectual property lawyer will clarify whether a particular type of work qualifies for legal protection. It is important to remember that legal action may not be brought until work is registered, even if blatant copyright infringement transpires. 

Qualified intellectual property lawyers are dedicated to keeping their clients in compliance with the Copyright Office and protecting them from being subjected to the civil fines that may result from improper actions.  Engaging the services of a licensed intellectual property lawyer will not only protect original creations but provide necessary advice on whatever legal recourse is available.  


Monday, September 19, 2016

Preventing Will Contests

So, you have a will, but is it valid?  A will can be contested for a multitude of reasons after it is presented to a probate court.  It is in your best interest to have an attorney draft the will to prevent any ambiguity in the provisions of the document that others could dispute later. 

A will may be targeted on grounds of fraud, mental incapacity, validity, duress, or undue influence.  These objections can draw out the probate process and make it very time consuming and expensive.  More importantly, an attorney can help ensure that your property is put into the right hands, rather than distributed to unfamiliar people or organizations that you did not intend to provide for. 

At the time you executed the will, you must have been mentally competent, or of “sound mind.”  A court will inquire as to whether you had full awareness of what you were doing.   There will also be an inquiry into your understanding and knowledge of the assets in your name.  If, at the moment you executed the will, you were pressured or influenced by another individual to sign the document, it may be invalidated. 

If the document was signed under duress or undue influence, the provisions are likely to be against your intentions or requests.  Moreover, if you are trying to nullify a will on your own behalf, you are likely to need an attorney because it is very difficult and complicated to demonstrate the existence of duress, fraud, or undue influence.   If drafting a new will, counsel can ensure that your document abides by all of the validity requirements, so the will’s provisions can successfully carry out your intentions after your death.

For example, the will creator or “testator,” is usually required to sign the document before several witnesses who are over the age of eighteen, during a certain period of time.  A will or a certain bequest to a person could be deemed void if the beneficiary was also a witness.   In your state, you may be able to execute a “self-proving affidavit,” which may do away with some of the requirements in order to establish a valid will.  The testator should also designate a person to execute the document.  Consult your attorney to ensure that your will comports with your state’s particular laws and is sustainable against any future contests.  

 


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